Acidity: 12 Diet And Health Tips To Manage Acidity and Prevent Indigestion

Indigestion, also known as dyspepsia, is a general term for pain or discomfort felt after meals in the stomach region, associated with difficulty in digesting food. It can strike at any time, but is most common shortly after eating. If you get any of these symptoms, if you have a past history of peptic ulcer or a condition called Barrett’s oesophagus, or if you develop persistent indigestion or reflux (especially with weight loss) over the age of 55, your doctor may recommend further investigations. Indigestion is usually caused by inflammation in your stomach. This is often due to an excess of stomach acid, which your body produces to digest food.

Acid reflux is a fairly common condition that occurs when stomach acids and other stomach contents back up into the esophagus through the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The LES is a muscular ring located in the digestive tract where the esophagus meets the stomach. The LES opens to allow food into the stomach when you swallow, and then closes to prevent stomach contents from rising up into the esophagus.

Finally, nutritional supplementation can make a significant contribution in preventing acid indigestion. The recommended basic supplement protocol and the specific supplements, herbs and kitchen spices should be taken in conjunction with a balanced daily diet. Supplements are supplemental. They are not intended to be used as meal replacements for a healthy, nutrient rich, balanced diet. Moreover, dietary supplements are most effective when tailored to fit the dietary, bio-chemical, health and lifestyle related needs of the individual taking them.

The lack of understanding of the physiologic processes (mechanisms) that cause indigestion has meant that treatment usually cannot be directed at the mechanisms. Instead, treatment usually is directed at the symptoms. For example, nausea is treated with medications that suppress nausea but do not affect the cause of the nausea. On the other hand, the psychotropic drugs (antidepressants) and psychological treatments (such as cognitive behavioral therapy) treat hypothetical causes of indigestion (for example, abnormal function of sensory nerves and the psyche) rather than causes or even the symptoms. Treatment for indigestion often is similar to that for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) even though the causes of IBS and indigestion are likely to be different.

Gastroscopy is useful to exclude sinister conditions, especially in patients who have additional risk factors such as smoking, older age and a family history of upper gastrointestinal cancers. Many people — including some doctors — use “gastritis” as a fancy word for stomachache, but the term really means “inflammation of the stomach.” Most people with sore stomachs don’t have gastritis. When inflammation does set in, it can cause considerable pain and discomfort.

Other common symptoms of FD include heartburn , a sour taste in the mouth, excessive burping, nausea, and sometimes vomiting. Characteristically, these complaints are sporadic, poorly localized, and without consistent aggravating or relieving factors. The vast majority of patients experience more than one symptom. Functional dyspepsia may come and go and symptoms could present with increased severity for several weeks or months and then decrease or disappear entirely for some time.

What Is the Treatment for Heartburn?

indigestion daily basis

Some adults and most children under age 12 with GERD don’t experience heartburn, the most common symptom of acid reflux. Instead, they experience other reflux symptoms. Frequent acid reflux may indicate gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a chronic, more severe form of acid reflux that can lead to serious health complications if it goes untreated. Heartburn can lead to Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Barrett’s Esophagus and, in a very small number of individuals, esophageal cancer.

“That may not be true,” says Dr. Kyle Staller, a gastroenterologist at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. “The foods that trigger heartburn are different for everyone.” He suggests keeping a journal to determine which foods cause symptoms. About one-third of patients with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not respond symptomatically to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Many of these patients do not suffer from GERD, but may have underlying functional heartburn or atypical chest pain. Other causes of failure to respond to PPIs include inadequate acid suppression, non-acid reflux, oesophageal hypersensitivity, oesophageal dysmotility and psychological comorbidities.

Some recent studies have suggested that long-term PPI use may increase the risk of dementia, heart attack, and chronic kidney disease, although this has not been proved. Talk to your doctor about any irregular stomach pains or frequent pain, diarrhea, nausea or constipation.

professionals about what acid indigestion is and how to treat it. The extent of the conceptual confusion associated with acid indigestion is enough to cause a person to have heartburn (not to be confused with acid indigestion). A number of reasons can lead to diarrhea after eating, or postprandial diarrhea (PD). In acute cases, it could be due to an infection or the use of antibiotics.

Testing in indigestion is directed primarily at excluding the presence of other GI diseases and non-GI diseases. Some people may require specific testing of certain GI functions. It is important to exclude other causes for the indigestion since their treatment will be different from indigestion without a clear cause. Since the heart sits near the stomach, there often is confusion about what is causing lower chest or upper abdominal pain. Therefore, indigestion should be considered in anyone with lower chest pain, and heart attack should be considered in anyone with upper abdominal pain.

indigestion daily basis

Since indigestion and lactose intolerance both are common, the two conditions may coexist. In this situation, restricting lactose will improve the symptoms of lactose intolerance, but will not affect the symptoms of indigestion.

Acid reflux, also known as heartburn, is the most frequent cause of indigestion in the UK. There’s nothing you need to avoid specifically because you’re taking ranitidine, but if there are foods or drinks that make your indigestion, heartburn or ulcer symptoms worse then clearly it’s best to avoid these. However, if you’ve been prescribed ranitidine to treat a peptic ulcer or reflux oesophagitis, it may take a few weeks of treatment before these conditions heal. Some conditions may require you to take ranitidine on a long-term basis, either to keep symptoms under control or to avoid the condition coming back.

When Should I Call the Doctor About Indigestion?

Indigestion is a chronic disease that usually lasts years, if not a lifetime. It does, however, display periodicity, which means that the symptoms may be more frequent or severe for days, weeks, or months and then less frequent or severe for days, weeks, or months. The reasons for these fluctuations are unknown.

indigestion daily basis

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