Indigestion in pregnancy

It found that only the twice daily regimen significantly reduced symptoms of heartburn compared with placebo (mean reduction of 44%, 95% CI 15 to 73). Adverse fetal outcomes were not reported [Larson et al, 1997]. This study was not included in the Cochrane systematic review because of its crossover design [Phupong and Hanprasertpong, 2015].

The ring, or sphincter, around the bottom of the esophagus that keeps the food and stomach acid in your stomach, is made up of smooth muscle. It may burn, but it doesn’t have anything to do with your heart. Heartburn happens when food and acid from your stomach move back into your esophagus (the tube that goes from the back of your mouth to your stomach).

If you have severe indigestion or changes to your diet haven’t helped, ask your GP, midwife or pharmacist for advice on medicines that are safe to take during pregnancy and right for your symptoms. Try to stay sitting upright after eating, as lying down may cause you to bring up a little food.

These may include beans, cabbage, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, broccoli, asparagus, and carbonated drinks. Don’t rule out whole classes of healthy foods, however, as beans and cruciferous vegetables are very nutritious. Instead, keep track of your body’s reactions to different foods — meals that give your friend indigestion may sit just fine with you — and avoid foods that cause you problems.

How Can You Prevent Indigestion?

So, when what’s in the stomach backs up into the esophagus, it causes irritation that feels like a burning sensation. And, even though it’s in your gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the spot of the burning feels like it’s near your heart, which gives it the name of “heartburn.” It’s sometimes called acid reflux or indigestion, too.

Insufficient iron intake or absorption is easily detected in blood tests as iron deficiency anemia. After meals, pregnant women are prone to heartburn should not lie down. Ask your doctor about using over-the-counter medications such as Tums or Maalox, which are generally safe to use during pregnancy. You may find that liquid heartburn relievers are more effective in treating heartburn, because they coat the esophagus.

Why Am I So BloatedBloating is a feeling that your abdomen is distended or larger than normal, but it does not necessarily mean that it is. Gas (flatulence) also can be a problem if you are bloated. Common, less serious causes of bloating are eating too fast, too much, or too many fatty foods; swallowing air; pregnancy; and menstruation. Cancer and IBD (ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease) are examples the more serious causes of bloating.

When you’re experiencing heartburn, a handful of raw almonds can help you feel better, as can ginger or ginger tea. Also, try snacking on pineapple, which can act as a digestive enzyme. After dinner, we know it’s tempting to lie on the couch and watch Netflix, but try going on a walk to ease your heartburn.

Things you can do to help with indigestion and heartburn

treatment of indigestion during pregnancy

This pressure can push the contents of the stomach past the weakened sphincter and up into the esophagus, also leading to heartburn. Progesterone causes the stomach to empty more slowly after you eat while relaxin calms or relaxes the smooth muscle in your body.

It should go away after you have your baby, but in the meantime, you may wonder what you can do to ease the burn. You may be tempted to turn to an over-the-counter (OTC) medication, such as Zantac, to reduce acid. But before you do, here’s what you need to know about its safety during pregnancy.

GERD symptoms are common during pregnancy. But they rarely cause complications, such as inflammation of the esophagus (esophagitis). Most of the time, symptoms of heartburn improve after the baby is born. The effect of heartburn and acid reflux on the severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. A Cochrane systematic review on interventions for heartburn in pregnancy (search date June 2015) found a small study of 30 women in which the intervention group were given ranitidine 75 mg daily plus antacids and the control group were given placebo plus antacids.

More than half of all pregnant women report symptoms of severe heartburn, particularly during their second and third trimesters. Heartburn, also called acid indigestion, is an irritation or burning sensation of the esophagus caused by stomach contents that reflux (comes back up) from the stomach. Dyspepsia occurs at some point in around half of all pregnant women. It is usually due to reflux of acid from the stomach into the oesophagus. Reflux is not associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and therefore treatment aims to relieve symptoms for women.

Your health care provider can recommend or prescribe a safe medicine to treat heartburn or reflux depending on your symptoms. Heartburn is a common discomfort during pregnancy. Between 40 and 80 percent of women have symptoms of heartburn, indigestion, or acid reflux while they’re expecting. It can start anytime during pregnancy, but it’s more common in the second and third trimester as the baby grows. Most spicy, greasy, fatty foods known for causing heartburn are also likely to cause problems for pregnant women.

Because many symptoms of a heart attack are similar to those of common pregnancy discomforts, discuss heart attack awareness with your health care provider if you have any risk factors for heart problems. These include persistent high blood pressure, diabetes, eclampsia or preeclampsia, and getting pregnant later in life. Hypothyroidism During PregnancyHypothyroidism during pregnancy can be treated with synthetic thyroid hormones to maintain the proper thyroid hormone balance. Hypothyroidism symptoms include fatigue, weight gain, lethargy, and constipation. Treatment of hypothyroidism in pregnant women is important, because inadequate levels of thyroid hormones may affect the fetus, and child during growth and development.

treatment of indigestion during pregnancy

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